Often asked: What Are Employment References?

What counts as a reference for a job?

References are people who can talk about your work experience, work habits, character and skills. You should choose your references carefully. As part of the job search process, you may be asked to provide the names of people whom a potential employer can contact to find out more about you.

Who can I use as a reference?

Consider these eight people when making your reference list:

  • Recent bosses.
  • Co-workers.
  • Professors.
  • Friends… but only if they’re a professional reference.
  • Group members.
  • Any place you’ve volunteered.
  • The person you babysat for or whose lawn you mowed every summer.
  • High school teacher or coach you still talk to regularly.

How do I get job references?

Some jobs accept references from other people you’ve worked with – like a different manager or someone you’ve worked for before. Try to choose someone you’ve worked with recently. It also helps if they have a senior position in the company. Check with them first to make sure they’ll give you a good reference.

Do employers actually call references?

Essentially, yes. While it’s true that not 100% of Human Resources (HR) departments will call your references during pre-employment screening, many do. The references you provide to employers may be contacted about your employment history, qualifications, and the skills that qualify you for the job.

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Can a friend be a reference?

Although they can potentially be a personal reference and vouch for certain soft skills like your reliability and work ethic, your best friend isn’t typically someone you want to provide to recruiters as a professional reference.

What if I have no references?

If you do not have any professional references, offer to provide twice as many personal references if you can. A personal reference can be from someone who knows you, but has never worked with you in a professional environment. For example, they could be a friend, a classmate, a teammate, a coach, a teacher, etc.

Who should you not list as a reference?

Don’t Do It: 7 People You Should Never Put on Your Reference List

  • You Haven’t Had Contact With the Person in Years.
  • You Don’t Know the Person.
  • You Don’t Know the Person Well.
  • You Never Actually Worked With the Person.
  • The Person Has a Bad Rep.
  • The Person Has Been Out of the Workforce for a Decade (or More)

What do you do if you don’t have 3 references?

Even if you don’t have professional references you can use, you can often find other references that can confirm your skills and qualifications. How to ask someone to be a reference

  1. Make a personal connection.
  2. Be specific and open.
  3. Renew an old contact.
  4. Give them tools to verify your success.
  5. Show gratitude.

Can I get a job without references?

Do you need a reference to get a job? The short answer is yes, you need a reference to get a job. A reference should be someone from your professional or educational past or present (an employer, a professor, etc.)

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Can you fake a reference?

Fake references are illegal – if you’re caught. Directly lying is incredibly unethical, and if caught, you could be fired or face legal trouble. Companies rarely sue for lying, but the people you named on your reference list have every right to.

Are 2 references enough?

The preferred approach is for you to suggest one or two references most relevant for the job you’ve applied to. If the employer asks for more names, or makes a specific request – such as wanting to speak to your most recent boss – you can respond accordingly.

Why do employers want references?

Checking references is an important part of the job interview process because it helps hiring managers get a fuller perspective of you as a candidate. You typically need strong references to help make a strong impression on employers.

Do jobs really call your previous employer?

Most times, they will speak with the human resources department or your previous supervisor. However, employers most often contact previous employers to verify you are accurately representing your experience with them, rather than get a review of your time with them.

How often do employers call references?

Most employers will call your references only if you are the final candidate or one of the final two. Occasionally the final three or four. Every now and then an employer will check all the people they interview, although to me that’s inconsiderate of the reference.

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